Needed to make a special card for my sisters big birthday.

The front of my sister's birthday card
The front of my sister’s birthday card
Inside of my sisters birthday card
Inside of my sisters birthday card

This year my youngest sister is turning the big 60!  That’s a tough one, or at least it was for me.  So today I thought I would share this project.  I knew I wanted it to be a pop-up card.  I had an idea, but sometimes what’s in your head doesn’t always work out.  I usually start to make the inside first and when finished and happy with it, then I decide what I want to say on the front of the card and how I want it to look.

I like to start making the components first.  Once I know what images I want to use then I start pulling cardstock. I use a combination of my Silhouette Cameo cutting machine and steel dies. It took me a long time and a lot of money to find the products that are my favorites. As I said in the “Hello world” entry, my first cards were from a kit that included the pre-scored A2 card, insert with the sentiment printed, embellishments, beads and jewels, pre-tied satin ribbon bows etc.  Although they included a page of pictures of how you could put together the cards, this kit also allowed you to put them together any way you wanted to.

One day I was watching something on YouTube and the next video was a demonstration by a woman stamping an image and then creating a card.  I was so intrigued by her demo I started by stamps and boxes of cards and envelopes.  During her demo she mentioned that she always uses Gina K Designs white card on to stamp with.  I hopped over to the Gina K Designs website and discovered there is a whole world of card making that I never knew even existed.  I have used only Gina K Designs 80lb and 120lb paper for stamping ever since.  You can buy cheaper cardstock but nothing I’ve ever tried works as well.  In my experience with her cardstock, no matter what you’re using for medium to color with or even to color wash, this paper holds up.  It’s no savings if you have to redo your project because of bleeding or peeling.  If you’re new to making cards you should check her out.  She has kits with cardstock, ink, embellishments and everything you need to make beautiful cards to go with her featured stamp set.  You can also buy all those products separately, but what’s really great is the ink pads, cardstock, embellishments all match exactly.  Her stamps are beautiful and very classy.  She also has a YouTube station called “StampTV” for great inspiration and tutorials.

Back to my sister’s card.  I used the Elizabeth Craft Designs “Lots of Pops” pop-up die.  I find that I use this die more than any other pop-up die.  It does what it’s name suggests.  It has a lot of pop out opportunities to create a little scene.  The designer for the Pop-up product at this website are designed by Karen Burniston.  My first encounter with this amazing women was quite by accident.  I had commented on an Elizabeth Craft Die that I had recently bought on one of the social networks.  I was having trouble with it not cutting correctly.  At the time, I didn’t know Karen was the designer.  She commented back to me that my experience was very unusual and that I should contact Elizabeth Craft Designs http://www.elizabethcraftdesigns.com and see what they think.  Long story short, you wouldn’t believe the level of customer service this company provides.  They really get it and are vested in their customers happiness.  A few years later I have to say that the talented Karen Burniston has been my all time guru for card making.  Well, at least with my love affair with pop-up cards.  Check her and Elizabeth Craft Designs on her blog “I’m not left handed”.  Of course, to see her genius, you can find ECD and Karen on Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube and I’m sure others.

Products used in “My sister’s birthday card”

Elizabeth Craft Designs:  Lots of Pop die, Bathtub Pop die

All other images were created with my Silhouette Cameo

Colored cardstock: Recollections

Printed cardstock: Core’dinations

Front card die: Spellbinders nestabilities “Beaded Squares”